Information overload: how are we supposed to keep up?

I’ve always been hungry for news. I like to know what’s happening – and I like to know when it happens.

The thing is, I feel I’ve reached saturation point.

I jokingly summed this up in a recent tweet:

Throw in Pokemon Go (I’m not ashamed to say I’m still enjoying it) and I’m torn between the buzz of feeling in the loop, and information overload.

Continue reading “Information overload: how are we supposed to keep up?”

Different views: To-do lists

Here are two conflicting views on to-do lists.

Marissa Mayer, however, Yahoo’s CEO and former Google executive, explains that sometimes it’s making the list and prioritizing it that’s important—not finishing.

Source: Marissa Mayer Explains Why Having To-Dos Is Better than Finishing Them

Putting an activity on the TO-DO list is not the end, it is the beginning. DON’T CONFUSE PUTTING SOMETHING ON THE TO-DO LIST WITH GETTING SOMETHING DONE.

Source: The TO-DO List Is Your Enemy

I’m a great believer in to-do lists. However, I occasionally need a to-do item to clean up my lists!

 

How not to do sticky ads

Making ads sticky can help to improve viewability percentages – viewability is important to many advertisers.

Ads can be made to stick for a short period of time and then disappear, or they can be set up to be “perma-sticky” – so they don’t go away.

When ads are permanently stuck, publishers need to be careful that there’s sufficient space to display everything on the page.

Here’s what I saw on the Telegraph today, while viewing a story:

Continue reading “How not to do sticky ads”

A Southern Rail nightmare: my story

After a particularly bad day on the trains, I felt compelled to share my story and ongoing woes with Southern Rail.

Generally speaking, I’m one of the luckier commuters. Whenever there’s trouble on my route, I usually miss it. Sometimes an issue affects a train that’s one or two timetable slots after mine – or mine is the last good train for a while. Sometimes I can get a different train with minimal disruption to my commute. Very occasionally, train problems occur on a night when I’m out with a friend – so when it’s time to go home, things are nowhere near as bad as they were during the evening rush hour.

However, every problem has a knock-on effect – even if I’m often lucky with how things line up. Delays add up. And I’m already choosing my trains purely based on which ones I expect will cause the least amount of pain – rather than the ones that would get me to and from work for my normal working hours.

First, let me tell you about my typical daily commute.

Continue reading “A Southern Rail nightmare: my story”

A week of back trouble

A few weeks ago, I woke up and felt a slight twinge in my back. It felt awkward and very slightly painful, but I put it down to sleeping “a bit funny” as it wasn’t all that bad.

Over the next couple of weeks, the pain didn’t go away. It stayed pretty much the same, never fully rearing its painful head (or back), but somehow, perpetually, just “there”.

Last Monday, it got a bit worse. I phoned the doctor in the afternoon – they said to phone back in the morning. On Tuesday I started noticing quite a bit of pain if I turned, stood up, or sat down a bit too quickly. I arranged an appointment with the doctor that afternoon.

The doctor suggested it was most likely muscular pain, and recommended taking ibuprofen three times a day for the next two weeks. Tuesday night was rough – I woke up at 3:30am in a lot of pain. As I’d taken the first painkillers at 6:30pm the night before, they’d probably worn off by this point.

I stayed home on Wednesday and Thursday, attempting to work from home – although it was tough. I could hardly move without being in pain. I came up with an idea for a makeshift standing desk – basically a small table on my regular desk. Luckily the table wasn’t too heavy, but I had to be careful lifting it. That got me through Wednesday. After that, I had a bit more luck sitting at my desk. I’d previously booked a day off on Friday, so was able to rest that day then through this weekend.

For those of us lucky enough to not deal with pain or physical difficulties on a daily basis, I quickly realised how much we do each day that uses your back. Things become a lot more difficult due to back pain or an injury. Showering, getting dressed, going up or down the stairs were all particularly tricky. Putting on socks – normally such a simple task – became something of a mission impossible.

I also noticed just how much we rely on computers. As I usually spend a lot of time talking to people in the office or on the phone, being at home is not ideal. I was able to schedule in a couple of phone calls while I was at home, but for the most part I was communicating via email and Skype IM. Cue lots of typing – and while the makeshift standing desk helped, I soon got backache from standing up for too long.

Thankfully, I’m mostly better now, but I’ll need to be more careful in future. Monday is my first commute in nearly a week – I’ll see how that goes…